March 28, 2011

OPENING THIS WEEK - Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinness


On April 1, 2011, after the opening night performance, patrons will be treated to a reception in the lobby of the theatre with an opportunity to meet the cast, design team and crew. Plenty of tickets for the run of Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinness, at the incredible price of only $18.00 each, are available from The Curtain Club box office (905-773-3434).

Each season The Curtain Club gives back to the community through its Charity Night initiative. One performance of each play is given to local charities to use as a fundraiser or a volunteer thank you. The Curtain Club is pleased to welcome PFLAG and B’Nai Brith-Thornhill for Diabetes as recipients of the Charity Night for Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinness.

Watch Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinnessand enjoy some great dialogue! Call the box office today for tickets!


Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinness was first staged in July 1992, at the Hampstead Theatre in London’s West End. Frank McGuinness first came to prominence with his play The Factory Girls, but established his reputation with his play about World War I, Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards the Somme. It won numerous awards including the London Evening Standard Award for Most Promising Playwright for Frank McGuinness. He has also written new versions of classic dramas, including works by Henrik Ibsen, Anton Chekhov, and Euripides.

L to R. David Lang and Cam Lund. Photo by Davis Strong.

PLENTY OF TICKETS REMAIN - Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinness


In The Curtain Club production, the ensemble cast of three (3) actors, David Borwick (plays American prisoner Adam), David Lang (plays Irish prisoner Edward), and Cam Lund (plays English prisoner Michael), have endured a sort of boot camp to get ready to portray the physical attributes of men who’ve been imprisoned for a long-time. They have both enjoyed the chance to focus on the discipline required to challenge themselves physically, and lamented the limitations of having to perform within the confines of their basement prison set, which has few props and accoutrements.

Don't miss a great production!

L to R. David Borwick and David Lang. Photo by Davis Strong.

DON'T MISS A GREAT DRAMA - Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinness


Irish playwright Frank McGuinness uses powerful dialogue that questions people's inhumanity and highlights stereotypes related to nationality, marital status, and profession with humour that is sometimes black. The characters engage in “games” to while away the hours away in a manner that is equally shocking and amusing.

For The Curtain Club Production of “Someone Who’ll Watch Over Me” by Frank McGuinness David Lang (who plays Irish prisoner Edward), and Cam Lund (who plays English prisoner Michael), have endured a sort of boot camp to get ready to portray the physical attributes of men who’ve been imprisoned for a long-time.
Photo by Davis Strong.

March 23, 2011

BUY YOUR TICKETS - Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinness


The Curtain Club is pleased to announce the opening of Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinness; the fourth play of the 2010/2011 Season and the second play of the 2011 calendar year. On April 1, 2011, after the opening night performance, patrons will be treated to a reception in the lobby of the theatre with an opportunity to meet the cast, design team and crew. Plenty of tickets for the run of Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinness, at the incredible price of only $18.00 each, are available from The Curtain Club box office (905-773-3434).

The drama Someone Who'll Watch Over Me by Frank McGuinness is a play about human endurance, weaknesses, and emotion. An American doctor and an Irish journalist are being held captive by terrorists in Beirut. They exercise, they argue, they do what they can to survive. Suddenly, they are joined by an English academic. The three men display their national biases and prejudices, intensified by the cramped confines of their “cell,” a windowless basement room.